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. what will the u.s. do in those countries, if anything? plus, does the united states have a responsibility to intervene in the humanitarian crisis that was this woman trashing a liquor store when she did not receive prompt attention from a clerk? we'll discuss. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. >>> american military officials are claiming initial success in isolating moammar gadhafi's regime, after a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according tocy officials, coalition strikes have crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no fly zone is in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, at least not now. one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's compound in tripoli last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown, but he has vowed to fight a quote long, drawn-out war with western forces. >>> meanwhile, the pentagon says there is so far no evidence that civilians in libya have been harmed in the conflict, although it w
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
, water, blankets and shelter from the bitter cold. >>> the u.s. government is taking no chances with citizens and troops in japan. it is now telling all americans to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled nuclear reactor in fukushima. our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty is live at the white house with more on what they're recommending to americans that are in japan right now. hey, jill. >> hey, kiran. there's been a lot of change so let's go through it. late last night the state department announcing that they're having what's called a voluntary departure for the families of people who work in three different locations, embassies and consulate and another location in japan, so that is the u.s. embassy in tokyo, the consulate in nagoya and also the fsi, foreign service institute field school in yokohama. those people are being authorized to leave. they're not being forced or ordered to leave. it's voluntary still. state department says that it will have clarter planes available for those people to leave, 3600 if necessary. alsoer this saying those charter plan
there for the u.s. dollars is $32 a bulb. >> we were inspired. we both designed a bulb and installed them here. let's see how they >>> this morning on "world news now" -- breaking news. the nuclear threat in japan forces president obama to begin american evacuations. >> and because of a meltdown risk, families of u.s. embassy employees in japan are being urged to get out. it's thursday, march 17th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good morning, everyone, i'm mike marusarz in for rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. that late development about evacuations of u.s. embassy families comes as a japanese military takes desperate steps to avoid a nuclear meltdown. can choppers with water make any difference? >>> also ahead, tough questions about nuclear safety here in the u.s. as the president stands by his plans to build more plants. >>> also, one very personal fund-raiser for tsunami and earthquake survivors in japan. a little girl's successful plan to sell her toys in order to raise money. a very sweet story. >> it is a sweet story. >>> we begin with that urgent action to
in mlyangi. >> stock tock closed down over there six percent. >> u.s. naval forces are moving away from japan over fears of troops exposed to dangerous radiation particularly on the uss regan. >> rescue relief remains top priority but thousands of people are evacuated near the fukushima nuclear plant. if you look at it. second hydrogen explosion to rock the plant and the massive cloud of smoke is carrying radioactive conitalination and that is a concern for the u.s. naval ship providing humanitarian assistance. that affects uss ronald reagan a hundred miles from the plant. they detected low levels of radiation and prompted the ship to move further out to sea. in fact, the commander of the fleet. vice admiral, reveals that the ships are being temporarily repositioned and aircraft away from the fukushima dutch nuclear plant. it goes on to report that sensative units were conducted. 17 crew members were exposed to low level activity in the mission and the radio activity was removed from the affected crew by washing with soap and water and no further contamination was detected so far. >> so what
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
video. u.s. forces, japan, and great britain, are leading the forces. a top african official is calling for a transition in libya that would remove gadhafi from power and allow democratic elections there. mary? >> denise, thank you. president obama has yet to address the mission. publicly. he is expected to do so. >>> looks like march could be going out like a lion. it's chilly outside. meteorologist tim williams is there. and he has the "s" word in his forecast. >> well, hello, kai. good afternoon, everyone. we're looking at just the "s" word in our forecast. let's look at live doppler radar. we are definitely cooler right now than we typically are for this time of year. about 10 degrees or so cooler. we're at 45 now. and we're really at the warmest we're going to be for the day. give or take maybe a degree or so. what you're seeing on the screen right now is not really our main concern. that's really an upper level disturbance. it's going to move across the south portion of our region, maybe bringing in a light shower or two. down toward the d.c. and metro area. the bullk is still --
. the u.s. tells americans to evacuate the danger zone and sends in planes to get them out of japan. >>> and two exclusive interviews. tiger and trump. we go airborne with donald trump, who is sounding more like a candidate for president. >> part of the beauty of me is that i'm very rich. if i need $600 million, i can put up $600 million myself. >> and tiger tees off about his frustrations on the golf course. and the challenge of living life as a single dad. >>> and good morning, america, e on this st. patrick's day. the latest developments this morning. steam still rising from three of those nuclear reactors. one of those, worse, in fact. it shows the plant at a very critical point. and japanese officials saying, a slight radiation increase is too small to harm the people around tokyo. >> here's what happened when you were asleep. you saw the military helicopters. they tried to dump 30 tons of sea water on the reactors. they go over it. and a lot of the water dissipates before it hits them. even if all of it went in, all 30 tons, that would be a drop in the bucket. just to give you
's operator says radiation levels are fortunately still within the legal limits. >>> meanwhile, the u.s. now says it's moved its ships and aircraft away from one of the quake-stricken plants, after discovering some low-level radioactive contamination. the new york city "times" is reporting that the "uss ronald reagan" passed through a radioactive cloud causing the crew to receive a month's worth of radiation in just an hour. kristen dahlgren there with more. that country still dealing with some significant aftershocks. can you give us a sense, 6.2 overnight for us, how is that affect the effort to try to find survivors? >> reporter: well we even felt that aftershock down here in tokyo. it's making it terribly difficult for the rescue workers trying to comb through all of the rubble they have to look through trying to find survivors. you can imagine the fear and panic among the people that went through this earlier and today herd the sirens sound again and had officials telling them to try to get to higher ground. there was a slight rise in the sea level, no wave did come ashore. but just she
outside the reactor. so high that top u.s. environmental officials report that a single dose is enough to cause hemorrhaging. more from osaka, japan. >> reporter: yes, megyn. it is looking serious now in terms of the quantity of radiation emanating from the nuclear plant. it appears that we have significant problems at reactor 2 and reactor 3. hearing there are pools of water in a trench that drains off from the reactor towards the sea. it's about 90 feet from the sea, we believe. and that's perhaps one of the reasons that we're seeing greater contamination off the shore. the information is not entirely cleaand that is because they're not sure exactly where the leak is coming from. the greatest concern is that it's coming from the container vessel, indicating, indeed, that there is a partial meltdown. the meltdown may be temporary, that hopefully they will be able to fill that container area up and keep the rods cool. because the radiation levels are so high, it's difficult for the workers to get in there. if they're able to go in without getting radiation burns, it limits what they ca
, democratic congressman dennis kucinich speaks out. he wants to ban all funding from u.s. operations in that country. we ask him why live. nuclear mistake. operators say a strike in radioactivity that prompted evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an offic
detention at guantanamo bay. the u.s. plans to resume trial by military commission. want to get your reaction to the news. here are the numbers to call. the front page news in a lot up the papers. here is "the washington post" version. we will read more from the headlines here and take your calls. a lot of reaction in the paper to the of guantanamo bay decision, but we will spend a couple of minutes on the phone first to get some new information, if we can come on the situation in libya. a reporterl soschem, from "the associated press." the new headline suggests that muammar gaddafi is looking for some sort of deal. is that correct or just p.r. from the other side, if you can call it that? guest: it is hard to say. what we're hearing is second- hand reports. apparently, according to the era of new stations, there have been offers to begin negotiations of some kind. apparently one of the conditions is that the rebels would lay down their arms and the negotiations would begin. in the past, the national transition council, which has been running the side of the country has said they wil
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
on the ground were the clearest indication that intensive air strikes carried out by the u.s., french and naval assets over the past week have softened up the libyan military considerably. meanwhile, the front page of " the new york times" - below the fold in the new york times, there's a story on the event recovered live on c-span yesterday. this is prompting us to ask republicans to define what will define the gop primary. with that, republicans only -- 202 the area code. our first call is from ardmore, oklahoma. caller: good morning. i believe the people of united states, their first concern is the economy. another thing we have to be concerned about is full disclosure. in this administration under obama, there has never been such hit in things. he spends money like going to brazil and giving out this money. they owe us tons of money. under the clinton years clinton lent them $100 billion. it goes on and on and on. when did congress lose the power of the purse? the other thing which is the greatest thing in our nation is we have to come back to god and of this nation repents if my people cal
intends to highlight the increasing threat of home-grown terrorism here in the u.s. the lack of support from the muslim community. but many say it's unfair to single out a single group when attacks have come from non-muslims as well and see the hearings as a witch hunt and close to mccarthyism. russell simmons is one of men leading the hearing. >> it's the negativity we have this. these hearings will bring out more hate. >> julie: congressman king points to recent incidents like the attempted tame squire bombing. >> the attorney general the secretary of homeland security have all spoken about the increasing threat through domestic radicalization. eric holder back in december he can't sleep at night because of the number of young memorandum americans who are willing to take up arms against their government. >> julie: the hearings will take place on thursday held by the house homeland security committee and congressman plans several more over the next year. >> heather: thank you very much, julie. >> gregg: a shocking investigative report revealing an expensive public pension plan that cou
concludes this article with the statement that the u.s. does not have an energy problem, it has an energy strategy problem. think about that. it's not lacking the resources. it's the strategy for how we develop our energy resources. during his campaign, president obama liked to quote dr. martin luther king, and he talked about the fierce urgency of now. and there are few issues more important or more fundamental to our nation's long-term success than a viable energy policy. people are very correct when they say that parts of this will -- will take time. parts of it will take a longer period of time, but now is nevermore fiercely urgent than when we have such an important and such a long journey ahead of us. if we're ever going to take control of our energy future, now is the time to get -- to come together, support the policies that promote abundant, affordable, clean, diverse and domestic energy. critically important to us, madam president, and i look forward to these conversations that will continue on the floor as we talk about ways that we not only work to reduce our budget, ways that
that they comply with the u.s. -- with the security council mandate. >> so are you just watching them as proof -- are you watching them? >> we are conducting a wide range of operations across libya. i will not talk about the specifics. certainly the 32nd brigade is always considered in the calculation on how we expand the no-fly zone and how we conduct operations in the future. >> can you give us your assessment as of now of the libyan air forces? how many fixed wing and helicopters have you destroyed and will you try to destroy as much capability as possible before you get to the point where you can get the no-fly zone where you want it? >> well, when we began this, my estimation is that his air force is not generally in good repair compared to what you would consider most world standards for air forces. he had a lot of equipment that was old, much of it was sitting parked in the runways and it could not be used. he was effectively employing a tactical air force, a helicopter air force i would say on the order of several dozen rather than large numbers. when we began the coalition strikes, on
people. the chief spokesman for the government went on television saying, we might need help of u.s. military fighting the nuclear accident. already, 750 of the nuclear plant workers had been told to leave, to find a safe place. only about 50 had remained. and now, it's believed, even they had been told to stop for a time. japanese officials had begun using helicopters to dump water on one of the reactors. now, even that idea is deemed unlikely to work. pictures this morning show the helicopters trying. they had to stop. it's believed the last 50 workers were already the final line of defense, working frantic in an all-out race. and nuclear experts tell us they're likely using full body suits with air packs, rotating in and out on strict schedules trying to minimize their exposure. radiation sickness can begin to set in rapidly at levels of 1,000 millisieverts. that's the equivalent of 25,000 chest x-rays. if exposed, the symptoms are immediate. from vomiting to a steep decline in white blood cells wiping out their immune system. right now, the radiation levels
for the government went on television saying, we might need help of u.s. military fighting the nuclear accident. already, 750 of the nuclear plant workers had been told to leave, to find a safe place. only about 50 had remained. and now, it's believed, even they had been told to stop for a time. japanese officials had begun using helicopters to drop water on one of the reactors. now, even that idea is deemed unlikely to work. pictures this morning show the helicopters trying. they had to stop. it's believed the last 50 workers were already the final line of defense, working frantic in an all-out race. and nuclear experts tell us they're likely using full body suits with air packs, rotating in and out. radiation sickness can begin to set in rapidly at levels of 1,000 millisieverts. that's the equivalent of 25,000 chest x-rays. if exposed, the symptoms are immediate. right now, the radiation levels have retreated slightly to ten millisievert. equivalent of one c.t. scan for every hour of exposure. overnight, reactor number 4 caught on fire for a second time in 24 hours. one reactor exploded after
and their tiny westborough baptist church picketed at the funeral of u.s. marine matthew snyder, killed in iraq in 2006. snyder's father sued. >> i think it's an insult to every veteran out there that has served this country. >> reporter: the supreme court ruled the phelps are protected by the first amendment right to free speech. chief justice roberts wrote for the majority. "westboro may have chosen the picket location to increase publicity for its views and its speech may have been particularly hurtful to snyder. that does not mean that a speech should be afforded less than full first amendment protection." eight of nine justices agreed. >> liberals and conservatives have united in this on the side of free speech. >> reporter: justice samuel alito said the phelps inflicted pain on the family. "our commitment to free debate is not a license for mall ever lent attack on matthew and his family at a time of the church's well-centeredistrate see it which is central to the campaign." i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >>> here's your first look at some the other news going on around ameri
confidence. they say u.s. power plants are safe. that may not be enough to ease public concerns. new polling last week found a sharp decline in the percentage of americans who support building new nuclear plants. so far, that fear has not spread to capitol hill. lawmakers are certainly raising concerns but nuclear energy still has bipartisan support. >> i'm not persuaded that nuclear power should be deleted from the list of options that we look at. >> i wouldn't, if i were the president, sign an executive order to freeze all construction of nuclear plants as the president froze all drilling in the gulf coast after that disaster down there. >> reporter: right now there are 104 nuclear reactors across the united states. these facilities account for just 20% of the nation's electricity. far less than countries like japan and france. nuclear power there makes up 70% of the total electrical output. and developing nations such as schin that and india are moving quickly to catch up. the chinese are currently building 100 reactors. last year president obama said the u.s. cannot afford to fall behind
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
's response. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, meredith. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more 270 people, including 19 americans, died in the bombing of pan am flight 103, shocking accusation from defectors, that moammar gadhafi may have himself ordered the terror attack. sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made in the last days by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the lockerbie victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. stephanie's husband, michael, justice department lawyer, was on the flight. >> we had chosen to look the other way because of business
:30 this afternoon for the 15 suspected pirates captured by the u.s. navy in the arabian gulf february 22nd. they're accused of killing four americans as the navy closed in on them. they were sailing around the world distributing bibles. >> a man became unsteady on his feet and tumbled on to the tracks moments before the orange line came racing towards him. immediately, commuters came over and hoisted him to safety. the man didn't appear hurt but was taken to the hospital as a precaution. >> senate finance committee chair max baukus angry that republican proposed budget cuts would affect medicare advantage. >> would eliminate private medicare coverage under medicare advantage. that is the effect of the -- of hr-1. please, let's don't cut medicare advantage payments. that is just not right thing to do. innocent seniors are getting caught in this crossfire here. sure, we have to begin to cut federal spending. there's no question about that. let's not be so fool hardy. >> fool hardy. maybe he should have taken that up with one prominent democrat who has been promising cuts to the program for year
: good morning. my name is john. i am a u.s. navy veteran. i ever present all veterans -- in a what, we have to stop giving these people so much attention, ok? and then they hide behind god and all of his laws. stop being phony, ok? i live my life. i did not hurt anybody, ok, and i can never going to hurt anybody. in a what? what a shame? host: if you could hold on for just a second. we will let john finish. caller: one minute, please. it is a shame our politicians to not have enough common sense that they cannot come up with a law that will prevent these idiot people from protesting against people who died for the preservation of what they get to do to begin with. if it's kotite in the first amended to this argument. -- tie in the first amendment. caller: i understand freedom of speech is first amendment. i cannot come over here and say you are a horrible person and use all kinds of language and expect not have any consequence. that is what the westboro church -- they need to have consequences. and i prayed to god that god brings the wrath right down on them and hope some sick. in this
, mr. speaker, and my colleagues, that's not what american, good old u.s.a. medicine is all about. it's time, quality time spent with that doctor and maybe no prescriptions. and i yield back. ms. hayworth: it is precisely and thank you precisely the point that i'm agreeing on with you and we have all been driven to philosophically, we need to have solutions that empower our doctors, our patients and our providers to do all of them, to have the best and to do the best and consumer-based solutions are possible. our doctor's caucus is working hard on providing those ideas, real liability reform, which has to be part of this. we cannot possibly continue as we have been. that was a glarring omission from the a.c.a. but in addition, we need to recognize and appreciate and act upon the knowledge that our medical care can cost less. we do need to pay teaning to costs, but we need to pay attention to our doctors, providers, to use their best judgment, not empower something like the independent payment advisory board to make those decisions for us. that is a very dangerous thing and something t
floated by officials to make us screen all letters that are being sent by the u.s. postal service. something like that would drive up the cost of security immensely so that's a way that you can really mess with the system even without executing a successful attack. >> david ross, thanks so much for your insightful analysis. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >> i hope you're wrong. meanwhile, gretchen, steve, what do you got? >> thank you very much for asking. >> the orca that killed a trainer is back in action. he was greeted with wild applause. is this really a bad idea? a man who trained those animals says that animal could kill again and will. he'll join us. >> president obama wants us to all go green. take a look at what happened in one state when they tried to do it. yes, those are 3 x 5 foot solar panels on the street. the story coming up next. [ male announcer ] at e-trade, investing means taking action with professional-grade research. and some of the most powerful, yet easy to use trading tools on the planet. it's investing with intelligence and cold hard conviction. e-trad
is trying to recruit in the u.s. in new york hundreds gathered to declare it a witch hunt. >>> japan suspended the use of vaccines after the deaths of four children last week. health officials say the children died within three days of being vaccinated for pneumonia and meningitis. both companies are cooperating with the investigation. carnival recall bragss a-- carn celebrations are under way. it's now time for another check of the weather with al roker outside. >> all righty. thanks, natalie. what's your name? >> cory. >> and you're leaving for iraq tomorrow? >> yes, sir. >> be safe. come back and see us when you come back. >> thank you. >> let'sback. >> thank you. >> let's see what's happening. burlington, vermont. wptz, heavy snow, 25 degrees out. as we look at the rest of the country, we can see that storm system moving out through new england, bringing the snow to places and looking at wet weather out west, and another big storm system getting itself together in the plains that will bring mountain snow and into tomorrow night and wednesday some severe weather down through the l
nations is worrying investors that's pushing up gold. while oil and gold soar, watching the u.s. dollar on the back. back to you. >> mandy, thank you. chilling new video of the 9/11 attacks has been released taken from an nypd helicopter. this was retrieved through a freedom of information request. it is never before seen tape. h. this was retrieved through a freedom of information request. a new vent has opened in the kiluaeale volcano. officials say no homes are threatened. some stunning pictures though. back to matt, ann and al. >> you were able to report from there one time. >> we walked on the lava floes there. help me out on the survey. what do you remember gas prices at? >> 29, 30 cents. >> you got the glasses. >> towels. >> mark still has one of the glasses. >> those were the days. not anymore. >> that's for sure. these are the days as far as severe weather. talking snow in the northeast. we have a mess out west. here's the low pressure moving up bringing windy conditions and snowfall amounts, basically around 8 to 10 inches of snow through northern new england. generally one to
with that amount of money. we have this to report. general david petraeus, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan is apologizing for a nato air strike that killed 9 afghan children yesterday. in a statement petraeus said we are deeply sorry for this tragedy and apologized to members of the afghan government, the people of afghanistan and most importantly, the surviving family members of those killed by our actions. these deaths should have never happened. i will personally apologize to president karzai. military officials attributed the error to faulty communication as an air weapons team responded to an attack on a nato base. however, the strike is likely to increase already high tensions between karzai and nato commanders who came under scrutiny last month because of another case in which dozens of civilians were allegedly killed. >> we're putting our sons and daughters in an unwinnable situation. this as a parent of young children, this is an unspeakable tragedy. you also, though, look at the americans that are looking up from above, in a country they don't know, trying to figure out whether t
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)